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4 Reasons why it’s important to Preorder Books if you want to help an Author Succeed

Have you ever wondered why publishers and authors are always publicizing preorder availability? There’s some very practical reasons for it!

Preordering a book that doesn’t arrive for months or years might seem unnecessary but your decision to preorder directly affects the book’s chances of commercial success.
1. Pre-release, preorders signal to publisher there will be interest, and they can adjust print runs to accurately meet demands. THe size of an initial print run announces to the world the confidence the publisher has in a book’s commercial success. The bigger the print run, the more confidence, the more buzz. Under printing can be a huge problem, because often people who cannot find a book in stock when they want it, will forget about it and not come back and buy it later.
2. Preorders then build buzz and encourage larger orders from big retailers. The buzz around the book is a great sales point that gets big retailers to make larger initial orders to prepare for consumer demand. This is of course not a good thing if after the fact nobody buys them, because they’ll be returned. But having them ordered and in stock means that they are available and a book has a chance to succeed.
3. Post-release, preorders sales count as part of first week sales. These inflated numbers allow books to launch and climb the rankings onto the bestseller lists which guarantee continued sales. Being on a bestseller list is one of the best things that can happen to a book commercially. People who have never heard of it, and might have never considered buying it, will go out and buy it because it is on this list.
4. Support independent Bookshops with guaranteed sale for their stock, helps mitigate risks. Independent bookshops help authors with creating readership and awareness. Preorders are guaranteed sales, and it allows retailers who operate on small profit margins and are risk averse to have a guaranteed sale on a book. Independent bookshops work hard to create opportunities for local authors and illustrators, to help them create buzz and get books out there. Supporting indie bookshops is supporting the culture of books.

Special thanks to the team at Walker Books for answering questions about this issue as well as UK Book Publisher, Editorial director at Andersen Press, Libby Hamilton @LibbyHamHam on Instagram

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Racism in Children’s Books is Still Racism: #LibrarianFightClub

Shit People Say to Keep Racism Misogyny &, Antisemitism Alive and Well in Picturebooks…
This mind bogglingly tone deaf article “The Dangers of being hyper-aware” by Claire Hennessy was released today in The Irish Times. Note the quotations around “problematic” and “insensitive.” The condescending & gaslighting implication that because it doesn’t bother this white author, whether or not it is a problem, is up for debate.
The author of this article, an established member of the publishing industry as both editor and author of 12 books, makes several points that we often see in defense of problematic children’s books. In fact, it makes the rounds so it’s a perfect case study! Let’s explore some of the main points shall we?
Argument 1: ‘Without Racism, books won’t be good.’ “Danger in this hyper-aware, hyper-critical culture: of literary culture becoming so anodyne and sanitised it dies out entirely”- C. Hennessy

Removing racism from children’s literature will kill of culture? …whose culture exactly are you worried won’t withstand being held accountable to any standards of common decency and respect for others?

Argument 2: ‘Just give your kids the Historical Context Disclaimer.” “Contextualizing the dodgy bits within Seuss’s overall body of work Developmentally ages-3-4 Time is a completely abstract concept. Ages 5-6 they begin to understand correlation between certain days in their daily life (holidays, birthdays, etc.) Concepts of historical time don’t develop until ages 9-11. History is valuable, discussion on literary theory is interesting but learning goals should be age appropriate. How do you teach a 5 year old historical context with any level of valuable understanding, when they do not know what Friday is?

https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/articles/teaching-content/ages-stages-how-children-develop-sense-time/

Argument 3: ‘But I liked it and it’s inconvenient you’re ruining it for me.’ “The delicious insanity of Roald Dahl’s fiction is forever tainted by his anti-Semitic comments (his family apologized in late 2020)”-C. Hennessy. Oh, his family apologized so as not to jeopardize their cash cow? Well then, that changes everything!
Argument 4: “Your fave is almost certainly problematic.”- C. Hennessy. Gosh could that be because picture books are written almost exclusively by white people, to this day? Maybe the publishing industry allowed other people traditionally to write picturebooks, we wouldn’t have such a crap selection.
Argument 4: ‘Fine, let some people of colour publish a few books and stop bothering us with your whining.’ “Focusing on diversity of various sorts, and the need for more of it, allows one to side-step the knotty business of trying to distinguish between pearl-clutching and thoughtful concern,”-C. Hennessy. Whether or not the concerns of marginalized people about how they are represented seem trivial to you is irrelevant. Shockingly, this is not about you.
Argument 5: ‘Complaints on Social Media are Invalid.’ “tempting to wonder if people-particularly within social media bubbles…are taking it all a bit too seriously, reading too much into silly, entertaining kids’ books. How could anyone take offence to, say, Dr. Seuss,” -C. Hennessy. For the first time in history marginalized people have a voice that cannot be controlled by gatekeepers, Social media.; Dismissing the medium of expression because it lacks the gravitas of print media is just another way of maintaining the status quo and of systemic oppression.
Argument 6: ‘It’s too hard to fix we better do nothing about it.’ “Hard-and-fast rules to ensure inoffensive content are impossible” -C. Hennessy. Try not starting out with stereotypes? Try researching? Try editing? Try consulting with people you’re representing? Try harder.
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Literary Agents: The Fairy Godparents of Publishing

Demystifying Publishing Part 4 with @readwithriver

Demystifying Publishing Part 4 with @readwithriver  
Literary Agents:The Fairy Godparents of Publishing
A very practical Cinderella story.
What does an agent do?  Why do you want one? How do you choose one?
Saves and Shares are appreciated!
Fairy Literary Agents 
A very practical Cinderella story.
Once upon a time there was a writer who could not get to the publisher’s ball to have her manuscript read. “Oh how I wish I could go to the ball.” Then one night after many years of wishing one of her queries* was answered! An agent appeared.  
*See part three on How to Query.
Fairy Literary Agents
Pumpkins and Glass Slippers
Her Fairy Literary Agent used her editing magic to dress up her manuscript and get the writer past the gates into the publisher’s ball to dance with the editor.  Most editors especially at big houses will only look at manuscripts brought to them by agents.  These editor-agent relationships are cultivated over many years.  Even for publishers that accept open submissions (see part 3) manuscripts submitted by agents are seen faster and are given a response even if it is a reject.  Instead of six months, you can expect half of that time frame or less for a response.
Fairy Literary Agents At the Ball
Once the writer’s work was past the gates, it was up to the writer to make the editor fall in love with her work.  A Fairy Literary Agent can help you streamline your work, they can get you an audience with the best editors but, they can’t force an editor to love it or to like you.  That’s your job.  Editors call a meeting with the author before an offer is made to see if they will be easy to work with.  You CAN talk yourself out of a book deal. 
Fairy Literary Agents Finding you the right prince!
Not every publisher is one you want to work with.  Agents look for skeletons in editors’ & publishers’ closets and steer their clients away from sketchy partnerships.  They have a history of working with various editors and teams and they will know who will be the best fit for you and your work.  Traditional publishing is a team sport.
Fairy Literary Agents Contracts
Standard contracts are NEVER in the author’s best interests. Your agent negotiates for you until it is. Beforehand: financial matters like royalty percentage &, production matters like cover approval. During: intervening in decisions that negatively affect the integrity of your work.  After: making sure your work continues to be in print and if it is not, fighting to revert rights back to you to resell.  This is just a fraction of what they negotiate.
Fairy Literary Agents, agents succeed if you succeed. 
Agents usually make 15% of the author’s cut, from advance and royalties.  They only get paid if you do.
This is NOT lucrative. Agents sometimes have second jobs, or take on more clients than they can reasonably handle to make a living wage.  This is a career people choose because they love doing it, not because they’re trying to make a mint.  A good question to ask an agent before working with them is how many clients they have and how much time they will have to work with you personally.  No one is more personally invested in your success than your agent, their livelihood depends on it.
Fairy Literary Agents: Finding the right agent for you
Having an agent is a relationship that ideally will last many years.  It’s important you get along well.  Often agents will take a client on for only one manuscript as a trial period.  It is vital you have an agent who you trust & who shares the same editorial vision you do. Head to readwithriver.ca for resources in finding an agent & querying.

Resources to help you find Literary Agents:

https://www.writersunion.ca/literary-agents

http://www.ardorlitmag.com/literary-agents.html

https://literaryagencies.com/literary-agents-childrens-books/

https://www.pw.org/literary_agents

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Help! My Child is Stuck in a Reading Loop: What to do when your child only wants to read the same books.

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Reading Loops are Normal and Developmentally Appropriate 

   Toddlers and young children thrive on the safety of routine and predictability.  This unsurprisingly extends to every facet of their lives including the books they will want to read.  This is one of the reason you will end up reading the same insipid book about the puppy who has lost it’s ball 572920139009 times in one week.

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The Growing Brain:

   Another element to this is the fundamental approach to acquiring skills and knowledge that is hardwired into babies and toddlers.  They will take apart and repeat a skill over and over until they have mastered it.  You might have noticed this in other tasks they get fixated on, such as opening and closing doors or squeezing all the toothpaste out of the tube whenever they get a chance.  They are focused on mastering this.  This applies to the books they have chosen.  They are going to learn every detail backwards forwards and upside down. 

Early readers should be reading each book at least 7 times..

Learning to Read:

    When we get to preschoolers and primary school children, the need for repeated reading is still incredibly important!  Studies have determined that early readers should be reading each book at least 7 times to really be able to comfortably read through and glean all of the lessons therein.

Should I Embrace the Loop?

     Embrace the loop within reason.  Reading books has many purposes and getting stuck on the same 3 books for four months limits the amount of new ideas, discussions, vocabulary and experiences your child is exposed to in reading.

Balancing is key.

How do I encourage balance?

   Rotate books like you would toys.  Every week, don’t keep them all out at once.

  Keep different selections in different areas, the car, their bedroom, the diaper bag, the kitchen, etc.

  “You choose I choose” I let my children choose two books each at night and I also choose 2 so that we have a variety.

  What other ways do you encourage your children to indulge in a variety of books?

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Encouraging Reluctant Readers : Top Advice from Teachers & Bookstagrammers

Not all children instantly love books. A reluctant reader will often struggle down the line with literacy skills and it can affect their feelings about learning in general and their own self esteem.  This can be frustrating for both you and your child. So what can you do?

  I have collected advice from 20 of my favourite bookstagrammers and teachers here on Instagram!  Tips that you can implement at home without spending any money.

How to Encourage A Reluctant Reader

  1. Let them choose books that match their interests, regardless of level or type. 
  2. Relax! Focus on enjoyment and relationship building with your child. 
  3. Make it a special time.
  4. Make books constantly available and reading spaces inviting 
  5. Don’t give up, keep reading to your child. 
  6. Let them see you reading 
  7. Consider Audiobooks 
  8. Find series books with loveable characters 
  9. Think out loud about what you notice in the book.  
  10. Don’t push through a book they don’t enjoy 
  11. Use books that start conversations.
  12. Take turns reading aloud.
based on advice submitted from participating teacher influencers and bookstagrammers.

@ReadwithRiver

My tips to make reading inviting! Create spaces that a child would want to read in and have a selection of excellent books for them to choose from.  Rotate the selection regularly. Focus on creating a special time every day where you can also read together and focus on keeping it fun.

@hereweeread

My best tip for reluctant readers is to find a series of books that match their interests.  When kids get to know the characters in a series, they feel connected, invested and want to know more about them. So find a few great series of books to keep them reading.

@kidsmakemess

My advice for parents of reluctant readers would be to relax! I know it’s tough, but try to stop worrying so much about what your child is or is not able to do. 

Find some books on a topic they’re interested in and read it to them. 

Enjoy books together without testing them or making them perform for you. If you can make reading a positive experience, a time for connection, your child is more likely to be motivated to learn. 

Another tip would be to “think out loud” – casually point something out as you read (a letter you notice, a sight word you know they’re practicing at school) or work out a tricky word aloud and then move on. But be careful! If you do this too often or too obviously, your child will likely catch on and get annoyed.

@thereadingninja

Tough to narrow it down because each reluctant reader is different. But probably my number one tip is to find a way to get into the fun of it with your child. Whether your thing is voices, or reading during bath time, or seeking out book events. If you as the caregiver can make it fun and set an example of reading being awesome then the kids will likely follow.

@litcentric

To help kids build stamina for longer texts parents can try an “I read, You read” strategy. Take turns reading a page (or paragraph) at a time. It’s a relief for reluctant readers because they don’t have to carry the full load by themselves and comprehension is better maintained because they can listen to understand when it’s the parent’s turn.

@thetinyactivists

Pick books with engaging illustrations to have conversations about, in addition to reading the text. Ideally, a series or a book that would lend itself well to being a jumping off point for extra interest in a topic.

@inclusivestorytime

“Allow them to choose the books, and set aside the time to read one to one every day. Keep books in every part of the house… even the bathroom! That way a book is never more than an arms length away.”

@aundreatsmith

 I would say allow them to choose the book. Even if we are the one reading to them, giving reluctant readers a choice is helpful. So I would show the child three-four books with topics they are interested in and then have them choose.

@kids.books.we.love

Togetherness and specialness.  Togetherness, making a set time each day and make it special, an afternoon tea after school, a special drink and a bite to eat while sharing a book to read. Whatever you do, make it special and be together

@creativekindergartenblogontpt

Find books that interest them with characters they want to read about. Foster a love of reading!

@mrskobysbookclub

All reading is good reading!

Don’t worry about reading level, or size, or genre, or if it’s a book they’ve read before. Reading is reading.

If someone only wants to read dinosaur books or graphic novels- let them. Building book joy and love is the foundation for lifelong literacy.

Oh and audiobooks are reading too!

Give your kid both- the book and the listenable format and let them follow along.

Hearing fluency modeled is a great way to encourage them to read along on their own!

@the.organized.bookshelf

My number one tip is to let kids see their parents enjoying books. 

@beckys_bookshelf

Find something they are really interested in and tie it to books. My youngest didn’t enjoy reading until I found him some simple biographies about famous runners. Also, audiobooks are a great option for some kids!

@teachasam

Make reading fun! Use silly voices and actions.

@mrswalkerreads

I think family members modelling positive reading behaviours is the most important. Since children learn so much by seeing (not telling), if they see others gaining enjoyment of reading, they might be inspired to give it a try. We tell parents/guardians to pull out a book themselves, read aloud picture books/chapter books, make reference to how reading helps them read driving directions (kids will internalize, “I need to read to drive a car”) or when a parent is cooking they can say, “can you help me read this recipe”… without pressure, parents can model positive ways in which reading is intertwined into daily life

Another tip we share in my role is  not to use timers to enforce 20mins of reading a night (even though we know it’s good practice)… timers make it seem like a chore and when the timer goes off, even if the child was enjoying the book, they will stop and move onto something else

With reluctant readers, we also tell parents not to worry about WHAT they are reading (comics, graphic novels, magazines)… let them gravitate to anything and praise!

Bring them to places where they will also see people reading… bookstores, library… they will start to see that reading is for enjoyment.

@Picturebookplaydate

Let them pick books they’re interested in reading – even if it means they’re reading something you’re not super excited about. Graphic Novels are books! They’re awesome for encouraging a love of reading!

(By “not super excited about” I mean like character books – not books that are inappropriate or anything.)

@bookbairn

It’s ok to give up on a book that’s not working. Forcing something that no one is enjoying is never fun. Put the book away and head to your library for something else. And if in doubt ask a librarian for their recommendations for books on a theme, topic or genre your kid enjoys.

@librarymombooks 

When it comes to reluctant readers, I always think of that J.K. Rowling quote, “If you don’t like to read, you haven’t found the right book.” My biggest tip for parents or teachers looking to help reluctant readers is to first explore the child’s interests and then find a book that fits their personality. I used to give my students a self-evaluation sheet asking them to circle various activities they were interested in and then used that to help guide them to a book I thought they might like that was near their reading level. 

Another tip I have is to be open minded. Many parents don’t love graphic novels, but reluctant readers do! There are a ton of graphic novels out there that not only have tons of kid appeal, but they also help children built important skills like reading with expression and better understanding punctuation. Because these books are highly illustrated, readers can use the pictures to help identify new words and better comprehend the story. Children may finish these stories quickly, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It is a huge boost to their ego to be able to read the entire book and they will usually return for rereadings, which will help books their reading skills.

Many parents also worry when their child chooses a book that they believe is lower than their typical reading level or if they reread a book over and over. There are actually benefits for children rereading books or choosing books on a lower level. Rereading allows them to develop a deeper understanding of some of the nuances in the plot they may have missed the first time and it can be an opportunity to practice their fluency. Sometimes they need a break from all the difficult reading they may be doing in school. Many adults are able to read War and Peace, but very few do because they want something more entertaining. Kids are the same way. 

Kids are figuring out their own reading identities and they have to have the freedom to explore and choose their own books.

Scholastic has two new groups of books aimed specifically for new/ reluctant readers that are fantastic! 

Acorn Books are intended for children ages four to seven and contain an excellent combination of easy-to-read text, color illustrations, and engaging storylines featuring friendship stories, humor, and magic. They also include tips for drawing the characters to inspire budding writers to create their own stories. 

The Branches Books are an ideal choice for those newly independent readers who are in between the easy reader stage and traditional chapter books. They have high-interest stories with simple plotlines that include easy-to-read text and illustrations that provide context clues and aid in reading comprehension. 

@mrsrussellsroom

Read TO your kids. That’s my tip!

@the.crafty.teacher

 let them read whatever they want. Blog, comic, graphic novel, book below grade level, I don’t care, as long as they are reading.

@teachingmykiddos

Honestly, I read this tip from Shannon over at @ohcreativeday about just continuing to read, read, read even when they don’t seem to be listening or don’t seem to care. So I probably read to my now toddler’s bum for months because she would just crawl away. So I think continuing to expose, even when they don’t seem interested, and creating a literacy rich environment would be my only tips!